Sunday, March 1, 2020

When Truth and Tradition Collide

The subtitle better describes the content than the book
title itself.
Since my last post, I've been doing a lot of interviews about Mary Magdalene Never Wore Blue Eye Shadow. There are some questions everyone asks me, such as, "How did you come up with that title?" Around Christmas time, everyone wanted to talk about the not-a-barn where Jesus was born, and a particularly fun interviewer wondered what kind of music I choose when David isn't in the car. 

At some point in every interview--often after some levity and laughter--the host gets serious and asks me, "Why did you write this book?" That should be an easy question, but I break into a sweat every time I start to answer because it is impossible to edit my life into a five-second sound bite. (Or an entire blog post, as it turns out!) 

I was a "good kid." I grew up in the Bible Belt and experienced Believer's Baptism twice--at ages 8 and 9--because my family switched denominations. From the fourth grade, I attended church Sundays and Wednesdays, did my "quiet time" every night before bed, and followed every rule every day. Such societal structures reinforced my Type-A personality, set me up for academic success, and gave me a constant awareness of and connection to God.

My spiritual foundation was first shaken in my late teens. I took religious studies courses at Rhodes College, and for the first time I was learning from people who did not believe the Bible to be the inspired Word of God--but who knew more about it than any Sunday School teacher I'd ever met. In my first semester, my eyes were opened to everything that is "wrong" with my beloved Bible, all the contradictions, textual errors, and historical inaccuracies.

For the next several years, I described my faith as schizophrenic. In class I was learning and regurgitating biblical facts that threatened to undermine my biblical faith. Many of my classmates abandoned Christianity as they learned there was no apple in Eden, Moses parted a reed sea, Jericho was destroyed long before Joshua got there, Goliath (probably) wasn't nine feet tall, there is no whale in the Book of Jonah, and Jesus was three years old when the Wise Men showed up. But I still had my quiet time every night in my dorm room. My faith in God never wavered, although my understanding of Him did.

After four years of keeping my academic side separate from my spiritual side, a conservative Jew put me back together. While studying Exodus 19 (where Moses goes up and down Mt. Sinai umpteen times with the speed of The Flash), Dr. Schultz highlighted all the places the Hebrew text repeats itself. The class already knew he would say the copied lines are evidence of multiple authors being involved in the creation of the text, but we didn't expect him to then use those so-called errors as evidence in favor of God's presence in the creation of the chapter.

His logic was simple: no writer or editor would ever "make the mistake" of including contradictions, errors, or inaccuracies in the final version of any text, let alone a divine one. There's no way the thousands of scribes who followed them would then leave the "mistakes" uncorrected. God must be responsible.

This is a bold stand for a PhD to make because the first question anyone would ask him is, "Why did God do that?" No matter how many theories anyone ever proposes, the answer will always be, "I don't know." And that's an uncomfortable statement for any human.

Available from all retailers February 23, 2021.
Maybe there's a little Type-A in all of us. We like to know what is true and what is false. How things work, and why things happen. To that end, we humans might prefer that God have an annual conference call with all of us where He answers questions, gives instructions, and maybe chastises those who disagree with our personal opinions.

But that isn't how God has chosen to interact with us. He is a God of relationships. He wanted to walk with us in the Garden of Eden forever; He did walk with us for awhile two millennia ago. He wants us to know Him, and that means reading His words, spending time on the hard parts, discussing them with Him in prayer, and debating them with others in fellowship.

Sadly this very quest for truth and the heart of God can lead to dissension in the churches. We must hold lightly to our own revelations because the stubborn adoption of one human's idea over another's causes denominations to divide. These Christians  insist those Christians aren't Christians. A nine-year-old girl wonders why a dunk is better than a sprinkle when she knows her God hasn't changed.

God wants us to study His word for ourselves, but remember that the mystery is in the text by His design. It helps us to keep coming back to discover more about Him, and as we know Him better, we want to share Him more. So that is why I wrote my book(s): I love God and His Words, and I want to share that with everyone. I want people to know they are as empowered to study the word of God as any theologian, and that it is okay to ask questions of His text and our traditions. (He can take it, and the church needs to be more self-reflective anyway!)

In time we will all be right and wrong about nonessentials, but disagreement must not divide us. As Jesus said, we are to 
“Love the Eternal One your God with all your heart and all your soul and all your mind.”This is the first and greatest commandment. And the second is nearly as important, “Love your neighbor as yourself.”The rest of the law, and all the teachings of the prophets, are but variations on these themes. (Matthew 22:37-40)

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