Monday, November 7, 2016

Wildfires and Politics

My world is on fire. Literally. Every ridge surrounding our city has a wildfire burning on top of it, and the smoke is settling on the streets of Chattanooga. It's suffocating and headache-inducing. As I write (and as I dread going back to editing that Greek exegesis waiting on my desk) the pain in and behind my eyes is intense.

Copper is not pleased that the smoky streets are
keeping him from getting a walk this morning.
Our figurative world is burning these days too. If you found this post because of a social media link, then you've also read posts and articles all about how America is going down in flames if Candidate X is elected. Maybe you've even shared a few stories, commented on a few others.

My Granny would have been right there with you. Back when there was an alarmingly high number of cable channels--50, as I remember--she watched just CNN. It was on 24 hours a day. She listened to talk radio and wrote letters to our congressmen. She spent hours in AOL political-themed chat rooms every night. She was the most informed woman I've ever known, and some of her passion "caught fire" in me.

So people who have known me longest may be surprised that I've stayed out of all the political squabbling. In fact, I've been avoiding Facebook and Twitter and everywhere else for the last six months. (Though to be honest, I started to pull away well over a year ago. Social media blurs the lines between opinion and truth, and the older I get the less willing I am to put up with that.) 

The election has only fired up the animosity that pervades our society, so once we've all cast our votes tomorrow, the arguing won't end. Why? Because we're all so selfish.  We vote for who we think will improve our own lives, regardless of how others may be impacted.

If we are all going to live with each other after tomorrow, then we need to stop trying to change others' opinions and start changing our own actions toward others. 

I've been spending a lot of time in Luke lately (thanks to that exegesis weighing down my desk right now). In chapter 10, a scholar tries to trick Jesus into contradicting the Hebrew scriptures when he asks how one can attain eternal life. He answers his own question: 
You shall love—“love the Eternal One your God with everything you have: all your heart, all your soul, all your strength, and all your mind”—and “love your neighbor as yourself (v. 27, The Voice).
And who is that "neighbor"? Jesus answers with a story:
This fellow was traveling down from Jerusalem to Jericho when some robbers mugged him. They took his clothes, beat him to a pulp, and left him naked and bleeding and in critical condition. By chance, a priest was going down that same road, and when he saw the wounded man, he crossed over to the other side and passed by. Then a Levite who was on his way to assist in the temple also came and saw the victim lying there, and he too kept his distance. Then a despised Samaritan journeyed by. When he saw the fellow, he felt compassion for him. The Samaritan went over to him, stopped the bleeding, applied some first aid, and put the poor fellow on his donkey. He brought the man to an inn and cared for him through the night.
     The next day, the Samaritan took out some money—two days’ wages to be exact—and paid the innkeeper, saying, “Please take care of this fellow, and if this isn’t enough, I’ll repay you next time I pass through.” (Luke 10:30-35, The Voice)
The neighbor is "the one who showed mercy" (v. 37). Not the priest and Levite who were literal neighbors--presumably sharing the victim's Jewish faith and living in his community--but the Samaritan. He would have believed and worshiped and lived differently than the victim. Regardless of all his social differences, his actions made him the true neighbor. The one we are commanded to love as ourselves.

On Wednesday morning, I hope the election won't have left you feeling as if you've been "mugged" and left "in critical condition"; but it looks like about half the country will feel that way.

It is time for us to start loving each other, regardless of our social differences. It is time for us to stop thinking so highly of ourselves and our own opinions that we can justify our disregard of others, or worse, we can justify attacking and hating others. Not just during election season--when America is on fire--but every day of our lives.

No matter what happens in the next 48 hours, let's go out into our smoke-filled streets and AOL chat rooms and show some mercy. (If that happens, I just might be able to reengage with social media!)

1 comment:

  1. This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.

    ReplyDelete