Friday, July 8, 2016

A Study in Botanicals

Looking at this photograph, I realize my taste is "square." I need
to add a few more "twists and turns" to my design aesthetic!
People used to tell my Granny that she should be an interior designer because she did such a beautiful job decorating her own home. She would respond, "I only know what pleases my eye."

I like that, so I've adopted her modest phrase as my personal decorating slogan. Teal ceilings please my eye. So do solid walls of tile. Bizarre? Probably so.

David and I now live in our fourth home (not counting those many months we spent living in hotels), and each new location has given me the opportunity to tweak my decor. I've changed some colors and fabrics with each new place, although our main pieces of furniture have remained unchanged.

Our new home has given me a unique challenge. How do David and I, who have transitional-to-contemporary design preferences, live in a house that predates World War I? One answer is symmetry, and it is currently on display in our dining room. I chose to hang 18 classic botanical studies, printed from the 1613 originals, in simple frames but to grand effect.

Once I decided that I "needed" a crop of botanical prints, I discovered I could never afford them in a million years. Small framed prints go for $60 each--and those are the cheap ones! It was time for where-there's-a-will-there's-a-way Amanda to make good on her reputation.

First I found a book of botanicals with enough prints in the right colors to tear out and frame. Besler's Book of Flowers and Plants fit the bill at $10. That was the easy part.

The hard part was finding frames at a volume discount. I spent months off-and-on searching the internet and stores for them. Finally Hobby Lobby had a 50%-off sale on wood frames that would work...as long as I was willing to attach the saw hooks myself. This made the project markedly more difficult, as hanging the collages evenly now depended on where I put the nails in the wall and if I centered the saw teeth. But at $3 per frame, I couldn't say no.

I completed this project one day when I needed a break from
tiling the guest bathroom. That's why there's a gi-normous bag
of mortar and stacks of tiles on the other end of the table!
Then it was time for innovation: the frames I ordered were larger than the prints, and I absolutely could not afford mats. Remembering the buffered tissue paper I'd ordered when I was archiving my family's memorabilia, I dug out 18 sheets, folded them in half, and laid them between the prints and the frames' backboards. For $0, I had a unique look that would preserve my project for years. (Buffered tissue paper takes acid out of inks and paper, meaning my prints shouldn't yellow over time.)

It took about 4 hours to do the whole project, from tearing out the prints to hanging the frames, and spawned a new personal slogan: "Practice, Precision, Patience." I'm going to need that one in every room of this house.


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