Monday, May 2, 2016

Fourth-Day Flood (part 1): the 10,000-foot Perspective


Once the ceiling panels were down, it became obvious
that this had been a long-standing problem. Boards had 
water stains, a beam was rotting out, and the upstairs 
floor was being supported by scrap wood.
Last fall when I wrote about my Hobbit Bath upgrade, I thought I was nearly done with the plumbing issues in our upstairs bathroom--and therefore nearly ready to write a post (or 3) about them.

I was wrong.

Here's the summary story: Four days after we moved into our 1906 new-to-us home, my best friend had the audacity to take a bath following a day of helping us unpack boxes. When she pulled the plug in the upstairs claw-foot tub, 50 gallons of water flowed around the plumbing, filled the space between the upstairs floor and downstairs ceiling, and rained from the dining room's coffers for 6 hours.

Sadly our disaster was declared a preexisting condition (in spite of our "clean" home inspection prior to purchase and a joke-of-a-home-warranty), so David and I were left to do several-thousand-dollars-worth of water abatement and repairs. We had no choice...if we wanted to retain our homeowners' insurance. Ugh.

To summarize a sixteen-month-long investigation: the people who had renovated our house in 2005 did a lot of DIY. Three of the four necessary feet on the claw-foot tub did not fit the tub. So every time the tub filled with water, the feet slipped out from underneath it, cracking the plumbing seals. Then water would flow along the easiest path (around the then-detached plumbing instead of through it) into the ceiling space and destroy the dining room below.

I'm a big fan of silver linings, so in advance of this series of posts I'll admit that I'm happy with the cosmetic results. The dining room had professional repairs (meaning I got to have a hideous red dining room repainted by not-me) that have since informed my house's entire decor. The guest bathroom also had professional repairs, in addition to the Amanda-and-David upgrades (it is now waterproof thanks to over 2,000 tiles!).

Stay tuned to read the horror stories and see the beautiful results...


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