Monday, November 2, 2015

Freeing Our Front Door

Christmas is around the corner, and I'm ready to decorate. I always start with the "outdoor" decorations, which for us are mostly located indoors. I'm that boring person who likes a single candle in each window, a big beautiful wreath on the front door, and not much else. Simple, but appropriate for our 110-year-old, square, red-brick house with 33 wavy-glass, wood windows. (Yes, 33 windows. And they all need to be covered by storms before they rot away!)

I've ordered new candles and a big beautiful wreath for my newly restored front door, and I can't wait to hang it.

I noticed this summer that our front door (and back door and basement door) needed some attention. It had been painted green about 10 years ago, and that paint was failing. I could see layers of other paint beneath the green, and I knew I needed to strip the door for new paint to adhere well and look nice.

I'm getting pretty good at stripping paint. My first project here was restoring a transom window that hangs between our kitchen and mudroom, and it gave me lots of practice with different types of stripping solutions. Based on my window experience, I thought I could strip the front door in about 1 week. It took 3. There were 7 layers of paint and stain to dissolve and scrape before I finally hit wood.

I almost stopped a million times. As each layer fell in sticky clumps on the drop cloth, I'd stand back and consider if the door was good enough to get some fresh paint. It never was good enough, and I'm so glad I didn't settle. Because I was shocked to discover this door is solid mahogany, and it deserves to be admired every time it opens and closes.

I used marine-grade urethane and a gel stain that matches the color of the interior pocket doors. It's dark and rich and only took 4 coats to heal and seal the wood. (Stripping is not a gentle process, especially when you're working on a vertical surface).

I finished the project by affixing an unlacquered brass kickplate to the bottom of the door, replacing the hinges, and polishing the doorknob and backplates. But all that shiny stuff doesn't compete with the wood door's tiny dental molding, wavy glass, and intricate woodgrain. The result is beyond my expectations.

I almost wish I hadn't ordered that wreath. The door it will cover deserves all the attention this year!


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