Wednesday, May 6, 2015

Surviving Mother's Day...with Family

My David with our precious niece and goddaughter.
David and I had been married for five years: the point when people stop asking "when will you" and start asking "why haven't you had children?" We had just started treatments, and neither of us were ready to talk about our situation with anyone. (We weren't even talking about it with each other very much!)

At a child's birthday party, David and I were pleasantly laughing as the kiddo struggled to open my too-well-taped present when we heard an extended family member stage-whisper, "Look at Amanda smiling at the baby. Maybe she'll let David have children after all." I fought back tears as David made a quick goodbye to the parents, and we left.

Ah, family. Why do some of us think it is okay to check our tact at the door? Why do we assume we know everything about others' lives? Family probably doesn't need a special occasion to get into your business, but Mother's Day will give the inconsiderate an extra-special license. Parenting is the theme of the day, so if you are present and married, they'll be wondering why you aren't diving into the festivities.

Survival Tip 3: Start Telling Your Story


A few years into our fertility adventure, I realized that the best way to interact with everyone I knew was with the truth. My silence only bred more questions in others.

But when you're still working through the immediate pain of losing a child or not conceiving one, inconsiderate comments and questions hurt (no matter who says them) and can force you out of a cheerful child's birthday party in a fit of tears and trembling.

So know where you are in your healing process. Surround yourself with your closest, most trusted family members, and make sure they know your situation. No one will protect you better than your favorite aunt or loving mom. They can watch out for you at events, advise you how to react, and tell you it is okay not to attend this birthday party or that holiday luncheon when you are at your lowest.

As you heal, you'll find it is easier to tell everyone what is happening in your life, and I bet the inconsiderate comments cease. Knowledge can produce understanding, and understanding can yield love. And fertility patients need all the love and support they can get, especially from those who've known them all their lives.

So how do you prepare to face questions at holiday get-togethers? Comment below with your stories or tips, and you'll be entered to win a signed copy of Barren among the Fruitful and a "Be Hopeful" necklace!

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